You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘ಕನ್ನಡ’ category.

Do you remember your history text books? I do. They were always a big bore, with random mentions of dates and events, never providing any insight about the historical times and the cultures. This was more so evident when it came to Indian history. The sections about Egypt and Roman civilizations seemed at least palatable compared to those about Indian civilization. I often asked myself why our history text books couldn’t be at least a bit interesting and insightful, and make the students inquisitive about our past.

So recently when I heard the text books for Karnataka state board were updated and available on the web, I was curious to see how the history books of today are, and if there was any improvement from my schooling days. To my horror, I found the updated high school texts very shoddily produced, full of factual, grammatical and typographic errors. I won’t bore you with all those – like those text books do – but will limit to one or two tidbits only. It suffices to state that if you open a random page, the probability of finding more than 3 errors (grammatical/ factual/ typographic) is almost 75%! And the probability of finding at least one error is very close to 100%. Very sad state of affairs in this time and age!

I started reading the 9th grade History text book. Just like you check one grain of rice to know if the entire pot is cooked or not, I will provide you with a sample ‘grain’ from this book. This short paragraph is about the new religious thinkers such as Mahavira and Gautama Buddha, their philosophical thoughts and the genesis of new cults/ religions (or whatever you want to call them).


ettana

According to this textbook, “new religions came in because there was a change in agriculture modes and what people ate. Buddhism and Jainism rose because eastern UP and Bihar came under new methods of agriculture not seen before, using iron ploughs. These ploughs needed oxen to pull them. There was a scarcity of oxen, because they were sacrificed in religious practices. Hence people were attracted to these new religions that opposed sacrifice of animals, and taught non-violence as a principle. This is why these religions became popular”.

I have read many a history book, but this was the first time I came across such an explanation. Of course, no citations for this conclusion are given in the book. The book is entirely devoid of any source citation. Neither does it make any distinction among fact, hypothesis, theory and inference. Everything is written as though it is crystal clear. I wonder what impression the teachers and students studying these ill-written text books will be getting about history in general, and of Indian history in particular.

When I shared the above section from the Karnataka text book on social media, I got a pointer from someone as to the source of such content in proof of its ‘supposed authenticity’ – A page from a book of 9th grade CBSE book written by R. S. Sharma. He is often cited as a source of reputable history by the secular circles in India.

DEBLv8DU0AEFrt5

Now, since this was presented as an authentic source, I read through that page. It can be readily inferred that the Kannada text book draws material from this text. This book too does not say how such conclusions were drawn. So not much help there. This book of R. S. Sharma is prescribed as a text for 11th grade students. Incidentally looks like the same book is being used from times long before I was in 11th grade! Nevertheless, I hoped there have been revisions in tune with current research. So I just thought of doing some additional fact checking, and took a random paragraph from the book – this one dealing with the coming of Aryans to India.

dasyuhatyA

This short paragraph is verily overloaded with facts, semi-facts, pseudo-facts, white lies, masked-lies, and blatant lies as you will discover below:
  • Aryans came to India in several waves (May be true, may be not, but the text does not tell why or how that inference was made)
  • Earliest wave was Rigvedic people who came to India around 1500 BC (Again, no indication how this date was arrived at, if there is any tangible proof etc)
  • They came in contact with other tribes such as dasyus & dasas who were original inhabitants (Absolutely no evidence given about how/if these tribes were thought to be original inhabitants)
  • They were a also a branch of ancient Iranians since their literature also mentions dAsa (This is the statement somewhat close to truth and supported by facts – that Rig Vedic people and ancient Iranians had something in common). But again if dasas were native Indians, did Iranians go from India (after Rig Vedic people came to India) ? The text remains mum about this.
  • After stating They (Rig Vedic Aryans) came into conflict with the indigenous inhabitants called the dasyus, dasas, three sentences later the author says “Rig Veda mentions the defeat of Sambara by Divodasa, of the bharata clan” – Isn’t it logical Divodasa be a dasa?
  • Now the author states “Possibly the dasyus in the Rig Veda represent the original inhabitants of the country, and an Aryan chief who overpowered them was called Trasadasyu’ – So within three lines another shift of the presentation! My only question to the author:“What were you smoking when you wrote this paragraph?”
  • Next he says “The term dasyu-hatya, slaughter of the dasyus, is repeatedly mentioned in the Rig Veda.

When I saw the last bullet, I saw a good opportunity test it quantitatively. All the previous bullets were inferences, opinions, hearsay, and not quantitatively measurable. But talking about “repeated mention of a word or a phrase in a text” is a *very* measurable quantity.

Back when I was in high school there was no Internet, or no access to a Rig Vedic scholar. Or even if I had, I do not know if he knew the entire 1028 suktas (i.e. 10600 verses, 21200 lines to be very accurate), or if he would answer my questions about the Veda. Thankfully, now there is Internet, and the whole searchable Rig Veda is available at:

http://www.meluhha.com/rv/

A search for the word ‘dasyu’ reveals that the word occurs exactly 51 times in all of the 21200 lines. Even assuming an average 5 words per line, this translates to 51 times in 106000 words. A whopping 480 parts per million! What an unbelievably high rate to be called a “repeated mention”!

Searching for the word ‘dasyu’ reveals that the word occurs exactly 51 times in all of the 21200 lines. Assuming an average 5 words per line, this translates to 51 times in 106000 words. A whopping 480 parts per million! What an unbelievably high rate to be called a “repeated mention”!

dasyu

Oops. Sorry. Spoke too soon. What R. S. Sharma claims is that the phrase ‘dasyu-hatya’ is a frequent occurrence. Not the word dasyu. Let me look for it, for I want to stick with facts.

hatya

The term dasyu-hatya (or something related) occurs a total 7 times in the 21200 lines of Rig Veda. This translates to 66 parts per million. *VERY VERY HIGH OCCURRENCE*. Really!

Moral of the story: Text book writers may be under a rock for decades. We need not be. Not in today’s information age. This research was to be done by the text book writers. But surely they have not done it. If we care about the next generation of kids, I think we need to do our bit so that they don’t live under the rock forever.

-neelanjana

 

Advertisements

ಭಾರತೀಯರಿಗೆ ಇತಿಹಾಸ ಪ್ರಜ್ಞೆ ಕಡಿಮೆ ಎಂಬ ಒಂದು ಆರೋಪ ಆಗೀಗ ಕೇಳಿ ಬರುತ್ತದೆ. ಆದರೆ ಮಹಾಭಾರತದಂತಹ ಕಾವ್ಯವನ್ನು ಇತಿಹಾಸ ಎಂದು ಕರೆದಿರುವಾಗ, ಪುರಾಣಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ರಾಜರ ವಂಶಾವಳಿಗಳನ್ನು ಹೇಳಿರುವ ಸಂದರ್ಭಗಳನ್ನು ನೋಡಿದಾಗ, ಈ ಮಾತು ಪೂರ್ತಿ ಸರಿಯಲ್ಲ ಎಂಬುದು ಮನದಟ್ಟಾಗುತ್ತದೆ.   ಇಲ್ಲಿ ಗಮನಿಸಬೇಕಾದ ಒಂದು ವಿಶೇಷವೆಂದರೆ  ಐತಿಹಾಸಿಕ ಸಂಗತಿಗಳು ಭಾರತೀಯ ಕಾವ್ಯಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಬರೀ ಘಟನೆಗಳ ಸರಮಾಲೆಯಾಗಿರದೇ, ಕಥಾಸಂದರ್ಭಕ್ಕೆ ಹೊಂದಿಕೊಂಡು ಬರುವುದು. ಇದರ ಜೊತೆಗೆ, ಪೂರ್ತಿ ಕಾಲ್ಪನಿಕವಾದ ಕಥೆಯಾಗಿದ್ದರೂ ಅದರಲ್ಲಿ ಕವಿಯ ಅನುಭವಗಳು, ಆತನ ಅಥವಾ ಆಕೆಯ ಬರವಣಿಗೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಕಂಡು ಬರುವುದೂ ತಿಳಿದ ವಿಷಯವೇ. ಕಾಳಿದಾಸನ ಮೇಘದೂತದಲ್ಲಿ ಬರುವ ಉಜ್ಜಯನೀ ನಗರದ ವರ್ಣನೆ, ಮೃಚ್ಛಕಟಿಕ ನಾಟಕದಲ್ಲಿ ಬರುವ ಉಜ್ಜಯನೀ ವರ್ಣನೆಗಳನ್ನು ನಾವು ಇಲ್ಲಿ ಉದಾಹರಣೆಗೆ ತೆಗೆದುಕೊಳ್ಳಬಹುದು. ಕಾಳಿದಾಸನ ರಘುವಂಶದಲ್ಲಿ ಬರುವ ದಿಗ್ವಿಜಯಗಳೂ ಕೂಡ ಆತನು ನೋಡಿದ್ದಿರಬಹುದಾದ (ಅಥವಾ ಅವನ ಸಮಯಕ್ಕೆ ಹತ್ತಿರವಾಗಿದ್ದ) ಸಮುದ್ರಗುಪ್ತನ ದಿಗ್ವಿಜಯದಿಂದ ಪ್ರೇರಿತವೆನ್ನಲಾಗಿದೆ. ಇನ್ನು ಕರ್ನಾಟಕದವನೇ ಆದ ಬಿಲ್ಹಣನ ವಿಕ್ರಮಾಂಕದೇವಚರಿತ, ಕಲ್ಹಣನ ರಾಜತರಂಗಿಣಿ ಮೊದಲಾದುವುಗಳೂ  ಒಂದು ಮಟ್ಟಿಗೆ ರಾಜರ ಇತಿಹಾಸದ ವಿವರಗಳನ್ನು ಕೊಡುವ ಕಾವ್ಯಗಳೇ.

ಇವೆಲ್ಲ ರಾಜಮಹಾರಾಜರ ಕಥೆಗಳಾದುವು. ಆದರೆ, ಜನಸಾಮಾನ್ಯರ ಜೀವನ ಚಿತ್ರಗಳನ್ನೂ ನಮಗೆ ತೋರುವಂತಹ ಕಾವ್ಯಗಳೂ ಇರುವುದು ಒಂದು ಸಮಾಧಾನ ತರುವ ಸಂಗತಿ. ಇಂತಹ ಕಾವ್ಯಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಒಂದು ಅಮರುಕ ಕವಿಯ ಅಮರುಶತಕ ಅಥವಾ ಅಮರುಕಶತಕ. ಇದು ಸಾಮಾನ್ಯ ಜನಗಳ ಜೀವನದಲ್ಲಿರುವಂತಹ ಪ್ರೀತಿ ಪ್ರೇಮಗಳ ಹಲವು ಚಿತ್ರಗಳನ್ನು ಕೊಡುವಂತಹ ಒಂದು ಮುಕ್ತಕ ಕಾವ್ಯ.  ಮುಕ್ತಕ ಕಾವ್ಯವೆಂದರೆ ಇದರಲ್ಲಿ ಪ್ರತಿಯೊಂದು ಪದ್ಯವನ್ನೂ ತಂತಾನೇ ಸ್ವಯಂಪೂರ್ಣ. ಒಂದೇ ಪದ್ಯವನ್ನು ಓದಿದರೂ, ಅದು ಒಂದು ಪೂರ್ಣ ಅನುಭವವನ್ನು ಕೊಡುತ್ತದಾದ್ದರಿಂದ  ಈ ಹೆಸರು, ಮುತ್ತು ಒಂಟಿಯಾಗಿದ್ದರೂ, ಸರವಾಗಿ ಕೋದರೂ ಅದು ಸೊಗಸೇ ತಾನೇ? ಹಾಗಾಗಿ ಇಂತಹ ಕಾವ್ಯಗಳಿಗೆ ಈ ಹೆಸರು ಬಹಳ ಒಪ್ಪುತ್ತದೆ. ಅಮರುಕನ ಒಂದೊಂದು ಪದ್ಯವೂ ನೂರು ಕಾವ್ಯಗಳ ರಸಾನುಭವವನ್ನು ಕೊಡುತ್ತದೆಂದು ಅವನ ನಂತರದ ಲಾಕ್ಷಣಿಕರು ಹೇಳಿರುವುದುಂಟು. ಗಂಡು ಹೆಣ್ಣಿನ ನಡುವಿನ ನವಿರಾದ ಪ್ರೇಮ ವಿರಹ ದುಗುಡ ಮೊದಲಾದ ಎಲ್ಲ ಭಾವನೆಗಳನ್ನು ಚಿತ್ರಿಸುವುದರಲ್ಲಿ ಅಮರುಕನಿಗೆ ಅವನೇ ಸಾಟಿ.

ಅಮರುಕನ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ನಮಗೆ ತಿಳಿದಿರುವುದು ಕಡಿಮೆಯೇ. ಈತ ಎಂಟನೇ ಶತಮಾನದಲ್ಲಿದ್ದನೆಂಬುದು ಖಚಿತವಾಗಿ ಹೇಳಬಹುದಾದ ವಿಷಯ. ಈಗ ಕಾಶ್ಮೀರದ ರಾಜನೆಂದೂ,  ಮಾಹಿಷ್ಮತಿಯ ರಾಜನೆಂದೂ ದಂತ ಕಥೆಗಳಿವೆ. ಇವನು ಅಮರುಶತಕ ವೆಂಬ ಹೆಸರಿನಲ್ಲಿ ಪ್ರಖ್ಯಾತವಾಗಿರುವ ಒಂದು ನೂರು ಪದ್ಯಗಳನ್ನು ಸಂಸ್ಕೃತದಲ್ಲಿ ಬರೆದಿದ್ದಾನೆ. ಈ ಪದ್ಯಗಳ ವಿಷಯವೆಂದರೆ ಗಂಡು ಹೆಣ್ಣಿನ ನಡುವಿನ ಪ್ರೇಮ. ಅಮರುಕನ ಒಂದೊಂದು ಬಿಡಿಪದ್ಯವೇ ಒಂದೊಂದು ಕಾವ್ಯದಷ್ಟು  ರಸವತ್ತಾಗಿರುತ್ತದೆಂದು ನಂತರದ ಕವಿಗಳು, ವಿಮರ್ಶಕರು ಹೊಗಳಿದ್ದಾರೆ.  ಈಗ ದೊರಕಿರುವ ಬೇರೆ ಬೇರೆ ಅಮರುಕ ಶತಕದ ಟೀಕೆಗಳಲ್ಲಿ, ಮತ್ತೆ ಇತರ ಕಾವ್ಯಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಅಮರುಕನ ಹೆಸರಲ್ಲಿ ಕೊಟ್ಟಿರುವ ಪದ್ಯಗಳನ್ನೂ ಸೇರಿಸಿದರೆ, ಶತಕವೆಂದರೆ ನೂರು ಪದ್ಯವಿರಬೇಕಾದರೂ ಸುಮಾರು ೧೬೦ ಪದ್ಯಗಳು ಅಮರುಕನದ್ದೆಂದು ಬಳಕೆಯಲ್ಲಿವೆ. ಅಮರುಕನ ಪದ್ಯಗಳು ಅವುಗಳ ಲಾಲಿತ್ಯಕ್ಕೆ ಹೆಸರುವಾಸಿ.
ಈತನ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಇನ್ನೊಂದು ಕಥೆಯೂ ಇದೆ. ಮಂಡನಮಿಶ್ರರ ಹೆಂಡತಿ ಉಭಯಭಾರತಿಯ ಜೊತೆ  ಆದಿಶಂಕರರ ವಾದ ನಡೆಯುತ್ತಿದ್ದಾಗ ಆಕೆ ಸಾಂಸಾರಿಕ ಜೀವನದ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಪ್ರಶ್ನೆ ಮಾಡಲು, ಬಾಲ ಸನ್ಯಾಸಿಯಾಗಿದ್ದ ಶಂಕರರು ತಮ್ಮ ಅನುಭವದಿಂದಲೇ ಆ ಪ್ರಶ್ನೆಗೆ ಉತ್ತರಿಸಬೇಕೆಂದು, ಅಕಾಲದಲ್ಲಿ ಸತ್ತು ಹೋಗಿದ್ದ ಅಮರುಕ ರಾಜನ ದೇಹದಲ್ಲಿ  ಪರಕಾಯ ಪ್ರವೇಶಮಾಡಿದ್ದರೆಂದೂ, ಆ ಸಮಯದಲ್ಲಿ ಅವರು ಬರೆದ ಪದ್ಯಗಳೇ ಈ ಅಮರುಶತಕವೆಂದೂ ಕೆಲವು ಶಂಕರ ವಿಜಯ ಕಾವ್ಯಗಳು ಹೇಳುತ್ತವೆ. ಇವುಗಳನ್ನು ಅತಿಶಯೋಕ್ತಿಯೆಂದೆನ್ನಬಹುದೇ ಹೊರತು, ಇವುಗಳಿಗೆ ಸತ್ಯವನ್ನು ಆರೋಪಿಸಬೇಕಾಗಿಲ್ಲ.

ಈ ಕಥೆ ಹಾಗಿರಲಿ. ಆದರೆ ಅಮರುಕ ಶತಕದಲ್ಲಿರುವ ಪದ್ಯಗಳಿಂದ ಸುಮಾರು ೮ನೇ ಶತಮಾನದಲ್ಲಿದ್ದ ಜನಜೀವನವನ್ನು ನಾವು ಸ್ವಲ್ಪ ಮಟ್ಟಿಗೆ ಅರಿತುಕೊಳ್ಳಬಹುದು ಅನ್ನುವುದರಲ್ಲಿ ಯಾವುದೇ ಅನುಮಾನವಿಲ್ಲ. ಆ ಕಾಲದಲ್ಲಿ ಭಾರತದಲ್ಲಿ ಒಂದು ಪ್ರದೇಶದಿಂದ ಇನ್ನೊಂದು ಪ್ರದೇಶಕ್ಕೆ ವ್ಯಾಪಾರಿಗಳ ತಂಡಗಳು “ಸಾರ್ಥ”ಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಹೋಗುತ್ತಿದ್ದು ದೇಶಾಂತರ ವ್ಯಾಪಾರವನ್ನು ಮಾಡುತ್ತಿದ್ದವು. ಈ ರೀತಿಯ ತಂಡಗಳು ಭಾರತದಿಂದ ಹೊರದೇಶಗಳಿಗೂ ಹೋಗುತ್ತಿದ್ದುದುಂಟು. ಇಂತಹ ಸಾರ್ಥದಲ್ಲಿ ವ್ಯಾಪಾರಕ್ಕೆ ಹೋದವರು ತಮ್ಮ ಊರಿಗೆ ಮರಳುವುದಕ್ಕೆ ಹಲವಾರು ತಿಂಗಳುಗಳಾಗುತ್ತಿದ್ದವು. ಇಂತಹ ಸಂದರ್ಭದಲ್ಲಿ ಪತಿ ಪತ್ನಿಯರು ಒಬ್ಬರಿಂದೊಬ್ಬರು ದೂರವಾಗಿ, ಆ ವಿರಹದಿಂದ ಬಳಲುವ ಹಲವು ಚಿತ್ರಗಳನ್ನು ಅಮರುಕ ಶತಕದಲ್ಲಿ ಚಿತ್ರಿಸಿರುವುದನ್ನು ಕಾಣಬಹುದು. ನಾನು ಮಾಡಿರುವ ಅಮರುಕ ಶತಕದ ಅಂತಹ ಕೆಲವು ಪದ್ಯಗಳ ಅನುವಾದ, ಟಿಪ್ಪಣಿಯೊಂದಿಗೆ ಇಲ್ಲಿದೆ:

ಮೊದಲು, ಸಾರ್ಥದಲ್ಲಿ ಊರಿಂದ ಹೊರಹೋಗಿರುವವನೊಬ್ಬನ ಹೆಂಡತಿಯ ಪಾಡು ನೋಡಿ.

ತೊಟ್ಟ ಬಳೆಗಳು ಕೈಯ ತೊರೆದಿವೆ ಕಣ್ಣ ನೀರದು ಸುರಿದಿದೆ
ಧೈರ್ಯ ಚಣದಲೆ ಮಾಯವಾದುದೆ ಮನಸು ದೂರಕೆ ಓಡಿದೆ
ಗಟ್ಟಿ ಮನದಲೆ ನಲ್ಲ ತೆರಳಿರೆ ಜೊತೆಯಲೇ ಇವರೆಲ್ಲರೂ
ಹೊರಟು ಹೋದರೆ ಜೀವ ಗುಂಪನ್ನುಳಿದು ಉಳಿದಿಹೆಯೇತಕೆ?

ಸಂಸ್ಕೃತ ಮೂಲ:

ಪ್ರಸ್ಥಾನಂ ವಲಯೈಃ ಕೃತಂ ಪ್ರಿಯಸಖೈರಸ್ರೈರಜಸ್ರಂ ಗತಂ
ಧೃತ್ಯಾ ನ ಕ್ಷಣಮಾಸಿತಂ ವ್ಯವಸಿತಂ ಚಿತ್ತೇನ ಗಂತುಂ ಪುರಃ
ಗಂತುಂ ನಿಶ್ಚಿತಚೇತಸಿ ಪ್ರಿಯತಮೇ ಸರ್ವೇ ಸಮಂ ಪ್ರಸ್ಥಿತಾ
ಗಂತವ್ಯೇ ಸತಿ ಜೀವಿತಪ್ರಿಯ ಸುಹೃತ್ಸಾರ್ಥಃ ಕಿಮುತ್ಯಜ್ಯತೇ ॥

ಈ ನಾಯಕಿ ತನ್ನ ಪ್ರಿಯತಮ ಇನ್ನೂ ಊರಿಗೆ ಬಂದಿಲ್ಲ ಎಂದು ಎಷ್ಟು ಸೊರಗಿದ್ದಾಳೆಂದರೆ ಕೈಯಲ್ಲಿ ತೊಟ್ಟ ಬಳೆಗಳು ಜಾರಿಹೋಗಿವೆ. ಕಣ್ಣೀರು ಒಂದೇ ಸಮ ಸುರಿದಿದೆ. ಧೈರ್ಯವೂ ಮನಸ್ಸಿಂದ ದೂರವಾಗಿದೆ. ಇದನ್ನು ನೋಡಿದ ಆ ನಾಯಕಿ, “ಹೇ ಜೀವ, ನಿನ್ನ ಗೆಳೆಯರಾದ ಧೈರ್ಯ, ಕಣ್ಣೀರು ಎಲ್ಲವೂ ನನ್ನ ಬಿಟ್ಟು ದೂರ ಹೋದಮೇಲೆ, ಅವುಗಳ ’ಸಾರ್ಥ’ವನ್ನು ನೀನೇಕೆ ಬಿಟ್ಟೀಯ? ನೀನೂ ಹೊರಟುಹೋಗು ಎಂದು ಹೇಳುತ್ತಿದ್ದಾಳೆ.

ಈಗ ಇನ್ನೊಬ್ಬಳ ಸ್ಥಿತಿ ನೋಡೋಣ. ಇನ್ನೇನು ಮಳೆಗಾಲ ಬರುತ್ತಿದೆ. ವ್ಯಾಪಾರಕ್ಕೆಂದು ಹೋದ ಗಂಡ ಇಂದೋ ನಾಳೆಯೋ ಬರುತ್ತಾನೆಂಬ ನಿರೀಕ್ಷೆ ಇವಳದು. ಹಾಗಾಗಿ ಇವಳಿಗೆ ಮನೆಯೊಳಗೆ ನಿಲ್ಲಲೂ ಮನಸ್ಸಿಲ್ಲ. ಹೊರಗೇ ದಾರಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ನಿಂತು ಕಾಯುವಾಗ ರಾತ್ರಿಯಾದರೂ ಒಳಬರಲು ಮನಸ್ಸಿಲ್ಲ:

ಕಣ್ಣು ತೋರುವವರೆಗು ನಲ್ಲನಾ ಹಾದಿಯನೆ ಕಾಯ್ತು ಬೇಸತ್ತಾಗಲೆ
ದಾರಿಗರ ಸಪ್ಪಳವು ನಿಲ್ಲುತಿರೆ ಹೊರಗೆಲ್ಲ ಹಬ್ಬುತಿರೆ ಕಾರ್ಗತ್ತಲೆ
ಹೆಣ್ಣಿವಳು ಮನೆಯೆಡೆಗೆ ತಿರುಗುತ್ತ ಹಾಕಿರಲು ಹೆಜ್ಜೆಯೊಂದನ್ನಾಕಡೆ
ಕೂಡಲೆಯೆ ಬಂದನೇನೋಯೆನುತ ಕತ್ತನ್ನು ಮೆಲ್ಲ ಹೊರಳಿಸಿ ನೋಳ್ಪಳೆ

ಸಂಸ್ಕೃತ ಮೂಲ:

ಆದೃಷ್ಟಿ ಪ್ರಸರಾತ್ ಪ್ರಿಯಸ್ಯ ಪದವೀಂ ಉದ್ವೀಕ್ಷ್ಯ ನಿರ್ವಿಣ್ಣಯಾ
ವಿಚ್ಛಿನ್ನೇಶು ಪಥಿಶ್ವಃ ಪರಿಣತೌ ಧ್ವಾಂತೇ ಸಮುತ್ಸರ್ಪತಿ |
ದತ್ತೈಕಂ ಸಶುಚಾ ಗೃಹಂ ಪ್ರತಿ ಪದಮ್ ಪಾಂಥಃ ಸ್ತ್ರಿಯಾಸ್ಮಿನ್ ಕ್ಷಣೇ
ಮಾ ಭೂದಾಗತ ಇತ್ಯಾಮಂದವಲಿತಗ್ರೀವಂ ಪುನರ್ವೀಕ್ಷಿತಂ ||

ವ್ಯಾಪಾರಕ್ಕೆಂದು ಪ್ರಯಾಣಕ ಹೋದ ಪತಿ ಇಂದು ಬಂದೇ ಬಿಡಬಹುದೆಂದು ಅವಳು ಹಾದಿಯಲ್ಲೇ ನಿಂತು ಕಾಯುತ್ತಿದ್ದಾಳೆ. ಕತ್ತಲಾಗುತ್ತಿದೆ. ರಸ್ತೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಓಡಾಡುವರೂ ಕಡಿಮೆಯಾಗುತ್ತಿದ್ದಾರೆ. ಇವಳು ನಿರಾಸೆಯಿಂದ ಮನೆಯ ಕಡೆಗೆ ಒಂದು ಹೆಜ್ಜೆ ಹಾಕಿದ ಕೂಡಲೆ, ಮತ್ತೆ ಅದೇ ಕ್ಷಣದಲ್ಲೇ ಆತ ಬಂದೇ ಬಿಟ್ಟ ನೇನೋ ಎಂದು ಮತ್ತೆ ತಿರುಗಿ ನೋಡಿದಳಂತೆ!

ಈ ಮೊದಲಿನ ಇಬ್ಬರೂ ನಾಯಕಿಯರು, ಪ್ರೇಮಿ ದೂರ ಹೋದ ಮೇಲೆ ಸೊರಗಿದವರು. ಕೊರಗಿದವರು. ಆದರೆ ಈಗ ಇನ್ನೊಬ್ಬಳ ಕಥೆ ನೋಡಿ. ಇವಳು ಅದೆಷ್ಟು ಕೋಮಲೆಯೆಂದರೆ, ಗಂಡ ಊರಿಗೆ ಹೊರಟನೆಂದರೆ ತಾನು ಮುಂದೆ ಬದುಕುವುದೇ ಅವಳಿಗೆ ಅನುಮಾನ

ಪಯಣ ಹೋದರೆ ಮತ್ತೆ ಬಾರದೆ ಇರುವುದುಂಟೇ ಸುಂದರಿ?
ಎನ್ನ ಸಲುವಿಗೆ ಚಿಂತೆಯೇತಕೆ? ಏತಕೀಪರಿ ಸೊರಗಿಹೆ?
ಒದ್ದೆಗಣ್ಣಲಿ ನಾನು ಕೇಳಲು ನಾಚಿ ತುಂಬಿದ ಕಣ್ಗಳ
ನೀರ ತಡೆದಳು! ನೋಡಿ ನಕ್ಕಳು! ತೋರಿ ಸಾವಿಗೆ ಕಾತರ!

ಸಂಸ್ಕೃತ ಮೂಲ:

ಯಾತಾಃ ಕಿಂ ನ ಮಿಲಂತಿ ಸುಂದರಿ ಪುನಶ್ಚಿಂತಾ ತ್ವಯೇ ಮತ್ಕೃತೇ
ನೋ ಕಾರ್ಯಾ ನಿತರಾಂ ಕೃಶಾಸಿ ಕಥಯತ್ಯೇವಂ ಸಬಾಷ್ಪೇ ಮಯಿ
ಲಜ್ಜಾಮಾಂಥರತಾರಕೇಣ ನಿಪತತ್ಪೀತಾಶ್ರುಣಾಂ ಚಕ್ಷುಷಾ
ದೃಷ್ಟ್ಚಾ ಮಾಂ ಹಸಿತೇನ ಭಾವಿಮರಣೋತ್ಸಾಹಸ್ತಯಾ ಸೂಚಿತಃ ||

ಇವಳು ತನ್ನ ಮಾತನ್ನು ಬಾಯಿ ಬಿಟ್ಟು ಹೇಳಲಾರಳು. ಕಣ್ಣೀರನ್ನೂ ತೋರಿಸದೇ ಅದನ್ನು ಸುಳ್ಳು ನಗೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಮುಚ್ಚಲು ಇವಳಿಂದಾದರೂ, ಅವಳ ಕಣ್ಣುಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ತಾನು ಬದುಕಲಾರೆನೆಂಬ ಭಾವವನ್ನು ಮಾತ್ರ ತಡೆಯದೇ ಹೋದಳಂತೆ.

ಈಗ ಇನ್ನೊಬ್ಬಳ ಕಥೆ ನೋಡೋಣ. ಇವಳ ಗಂಡ ಊರಿಗೆ ಹೊರಟಿದ್ದಾನೆ. ಅವನು ವ್ಯಾಪಾರಕ್ಕೆ ಹೊರಟಿರುವ ಊರೋ ನೂರು ದಿನದ ಪ್ರಯಾಣ. ಆದರೆ, ಈ ಹೆಣ್ಣು ಎಷ್ಟು ಮುಗ್ಧಳೆಂದರೆ, ಅವನನ್ನು ನೀನು ಬರುವುದು ಯಾವಾಗ?  ಮಧ್ಯಾಹ್ನವಾಗುವುದೇ? ಸಂಜೆಯಾಗುವುದೇ? ಎಂದು ಕೇಳುತ್ತಿರುವುದು ಎಂತಹ ವಿಪರ್ಯಾಸ ?

ಗಂಟೆಹೊಡೆಯುವ ಮುನ್ನವೋ ನಡುಹಗಲಲೋ ತುಸುಬಳಿಕವೋ
ಅಲ್ಲದಿರಲಿಳಿಹೊತ್ತಿಗಲ್ಲವೆ ಇನಿಯ ನೀ ಬರುವುದೆನುತ
ನೂರು ದಿನಗಳ ದೂರ ಪಯಣಕೆ ಹೊರಟುನಿಂತಿಹ ನಲ್ಲನ
ಗಮನ ತಪ್ಪಿಸುತಿಹಳು ಹುಡುಗಿಯು ಬಿಕ್ಕುತಲಿ ಕಂಬನಿಯಲಿ

ಸಂಸ್ಕೃತ ಮೂಲ:

ಪ್ರಹರವಿರತೌ ಮಧ್ಯೇ ವಾಹನಸ್ತತೋsಪಿ ಪರೇsತಥಾ
ಕಿಮುತ ಸಕಲೇ ಜಾತೇ ವಾಹ್ನಿಪ್ರಿಯ ತ್ವಮಿಷೈಹ್ಯಸಿ
ಇತಿ ದಿನಶತಪ್ರಾಪ್ಯಂ ದೇಶಂ ಪ್ರಿಯಸ್ಯ ಯಿಯಾಸತೋ
ಹರತಿ ಗಮನಂ ಬಾಲಾಲಾಪೈಃ ಸಬಾಷ್ಪಗಲಜ್ಜಲೈಃ

ಈ ಮೇಲಿನ ನಾಲ್ಕೂ ಪದ್ಯಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಬರೀ ಹೆಣ್ಣಿನ ಬೇಗೆಯಷ್ಟೇ ಚಿತ್ರಣವಾಗಿದೆ. ಹಾಗಿದ್ದರೆ, ವಿರಹವೆನ್ನುವುದು ಕೇವಲ ಹೆಣ್ಣಿಗೆ ಮಾತ್ರವೇ ಉಂಟೇ? ಪ್ರೀತಿ ಹೆಣ್ಣಿಗೂ ಗಂಡಿಗೂ ಇರುವಾಗ ವಿರಹದ ಚಿತ್ರವನ್ನು ಗಂಡಿನ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಯಾಕೆ ಕೊಡಬಾರದು ಎಂದಿರಾ?  ಅಮರುಕ  ಈ ಚಿತ್ರಣವನ್ನೂ ಕೊಟ್ಟಿದ್ದಾನೆ!

ಈ ಪದ್ಯದ ನಾಯಕ ಒಬ್ಬ ವ್ಯಾಪಾರಿ.  ನೂರಾರು ಹೊಳೆ ಕಾಡುಗಳನ್ನು ದಾಟಿ ದೂರದೇಶದಲ್ಲಿರುವ ಹಾದಿಗ. ಆದರೂ, ತನ್ನ ನಲ್ಲೆಯ ನೆನಪಲ್ಲೇ , ತನ್ನ ಊರಿನ ಕಡೆಯೇ ತಿರುಗಿ ತಿರುಗಿ ನೋಡುತ್ತಿದ್ದಾನಂತೆ.

detail-from-one-of-the-mu-011

(ಚಿತ್ರ: ಅಜಂತಾದ ಹತ್ತನೇ ಗುಹೆಯೊಂದರ ಭಿತ್ತಿ ಚಿತ್ರ. ಛಾಯಾಗ್ರಾಹಕ: ಪ್ರಸಾದ್ ಪವಾರ್)

ದೂರದೇಶದಿ ಕಾಡುಮಲೆಹೊಳೆನೂರು ದಾಟಿಹ ದಾರಿಗ
ತನ್ನ ದಿಟ್ಟಿಗೆ ನಲ್ಲೆ ನಿಲುಕಳು ಎಂಬುದನು ತಾನರಿತರೂ
ಕೊರಳ ನಿಲುಕಿಸಿ ಮೆಟ್ಟುಗಾಲಲಿ ನೀರು ತುಂಬಿದ ಕಣ್ಣಲಿ
ಏನನೋ ನೆನೆಯುತ್ತಲಾಕಡೆಯಲ್ಲೆ ನೋಡುತಲಿರುವನು !

ಸಂಸ್ಕೃತ ಮೂಲ:

ದೇಶೈರಂತರಿತಾ ಶತೈಶ್ಚ ಸರಿತಾಮುರ್ವೀಭೃತಾಂ ಕಾನನೈಃ
ಯತ್ನೇನಾಪಿ ನ ಯಾತಿ ಲೋಚನಪಥಂ ಕಾಂತೇತಿ ಜಾನನ್ನಪಿ |
ಉದ್ಗ್ರೀವಶ್ಚರಣಾರ್ಧರುದ್ಧವಸುಧಃ ಕೃತ್ಚಾಶ್ರುಪೂರ್ಣಂ ದೃಶಂ
ತಾಮಾಶಾಂ ಪಥಿಕಸ್ತಥಾಪಿ ಕಿಮಪಿಧ್ಯಾಯಶ್ಚಿರಂ ವೀಕ್ಷತೇ ||

ಹೀಗೆ ಅಮರುಕನು ಪ್ರತಿಪಾದಿಸಿರುವ ಪ್ರೇಮಿಗಳ ನಡುವೆ ಅಭಿನ್ನತೆಯೂ, ಆದಿಶಂಕರರು ಪ್ರತಿಪಾದಿಸಿದ ಜೀವಾತ್ಮ ಪರಮಾತ್ಮರ ನಡುವೆ ಅದ್ವೈತವೂ,  ಒಂದೇ ರೀತಿಯೆನಿಸಿ ಶಂಕರಾಚಾರ್ಯರೇ ಅಮರುಕನ ದೇಹದಲ್ಲಿ ಪರಕಾಯ ಪ್ರವೇಶ ಮಾಡಿದನೆಂಬ ಕಥೆಗಳು ಹುಟ್ಟಿಕೊಂಡಿರಬಹುದೇನೋ ಎನ್ನಿಸದಿರದು.

-ನೀಲಾಂಜನ

(೨೦೧೫ ರ ಉತ್ತರ ಕ್ಯಾಲಿಫೋರ್ನಿಯಾ ಕನ್ನಡ ಕೂಟದ ವಾರ್ಷಿಕ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ಸಂಚಿಕೆ – ಸ್ವರ್ಣಸೇತು ವಿನಲ್ಲಿ ಪ್ರಕಟವಾದ ಬರಹ )

During the past years, I have posted the notation to one of my compositions in this space (and sometimes a recording too). I thought of continuing the tradition for this year as well.

Here is a sapta rAga mAlikA varNa, a garland woven in seven rAgas which I composed few years ago. The composition is about gouri, and I thought it was most apt to be share during this festival.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

(Dancing Parvati in brass: Image taken from pinterest.com)

 

The sAhitya is in kannaDa (bordering on sama samskrta), and includes rAga mudre. The lyrics are here.

sarasAngika vAchikAdi nartana chaturE SrI gouri ||pallavi||
suvarNAngi poreyE sadAshiva manOhari ||anupallavi||
gItaroopiNi latAngi ||charaNa||

ಸರಸಾಂಗಿಕ ವಾಚಿಕಾದಿ
ನರ್ತನ ಚತುರೇ ಶ್ರೀ ಗೌರಿ ||ಪ||
ಸುವರ್ಣಾಂಗಿ ಪೊರೆಯೇ
ಸದಾಶಿವ ಮನೋಹರೀ ||ಅ.ಪ||

ಗೀತ ರೂಪಿಣಿ ಲತಾಂಗಿ ||ಚರಣ||

The lyrics describe Goddess Parvati as one who is proficient in various aspects of dance such as Angika, vAchika and praises her as the embodiment of  song (ಗೀತ). The words can also be wrapped around to make her the embodiment of music. (  ಗೀತ ರೂಪಿಣಿ ಲತಾಂಗಿ – ಸಂಗೀತ ರೂಪಿಣಿ ಲತಾಂಗಿ)

You’d have noticed that the rAgas are Sarasangi, Suvarnangi, and Latangi. What about the rest? The Chitte swara is set in a rAga called Dhavalangi, and the ettugaDe swaras are set in the rAgas Latangi, Kanakangi, Dhaivatangi and Syamalangi.

Although I don’t have a good audio to share today, hopefully I will share that at a future date, but for those of you interested, here is the notation for the composition: sapta-raaga-maalike

Wishing all readers of “ಅಲ್ಲಿದೆ ನಮ್ಮ ಮನೆ” a very happy time during this festive season!

-neelanjana

The Murthy Classical Library of India initiative was in news recently with many scholars and non-scholars questioning the likes of Prof. Sheldon Pollock heading such an initiative. The crux of the matter was that such an important initiative must  be lead by  a scholar who is well versed in Indian classical traditions than Professor Pollock is.

True. Translating  is a tough art. Particularly so when it is from a language such as Samskrta with a long history,  and a tradition of advanced poetics which has lived for thousands of years. The fact that Samskrta does not remain  a commonly spoken language does not make the job any easier.  These facts have been accepted by scholars and translators such as Daniel H H Ingalls. If you are  interested,  you can read his essay, “Some Problems in the Translating of Sanskrit Poetry” here.

From the last several years, I have been doing stray translations of Samrkta verses to Kannada. While the difficulty of translation from Samskrta to Kannada may not be as challenging as from Samskrta to English, it is still not very easy. I agree that the brevity of Samskrta, the dual-meanings (shlEsha) it can convey enhancing the beauty of the verse are very hard to match. And as a translator, I believe that a translation has to be as close to the original to create the same mood, not introduce new concepts not found in the original and not miss out what is intended in the original as much as possible. While you can do a word-by-word translation, it is probably not the best in conveying the thought of the original. This is why a  translator has to know the language to which s/he is translating to a better extent than the language s/he is translating from. And also know the cultural baggage of both languages, so that the verse makes sense in translation.

In the past few years, I have translated about half of the well known work of Amaruka, known by the name Amaru Shatakam. You can find those translations on this Facebook page of AmaruShatakam.  Check it out if you read Kannada.

Although Amaru Shatakam  is supposed to contain 100 verses as the name suggests, there are about 160 verses when you consider all the available recensions. Amaru Shataka is considered as one of the finest specimens of Samsktta poetry about marital love. It is a collection of verses, and hence each verse tells a different story and can be read and enjoyed without reading the entire work.

Here is  a verse I translated from Amaru Shataka recently:

दम्पत्योर्निशि जल्पतोर्गृहशुकेनाकर्णितं यद्वचः
तत्प्रातर्गुरु सन्निधौ निगदतः श्रुत्वैव तारं वधूः
कर्णालंबित पद्मरागशकलं विन्यस्य चंच्वाः पुरो
व्रीडार्ता प्रकरोति दाडिमफलव्याज्येन वाग्बंधनम्

This verse, (#16 in the western recension of Amaru Shataka) is set in a meter called shArdUlavikrIDita. My translation in Kannada is set in mAtrA mallikAmAle but does not follow prAsa rules.

ಗಂಡಹೆಂಡಿರ ಇರುಳ ಸರಸದ ಮಾತ ಕೇಳಿದ ಮನೆಗಿಳಿ
ಅದನೆ ಹಗಲಲಿ ಹಿರಿಯರೆದುರಲಿ ಚೀರಿರಲು ನಾಚುತ್ತಲಿ
ಕಿವಿಯಲೋಲಾಡುತಿಹ ಕೆಂಪಿನ ಓಲೆಯಿರಿಸುತ ಕೊಕ್ಕಿಗೆ
ನೀಡಿಹಳು ದಾಳಿಂಬೆಯಿದು ಕೋಯೆನುತ ಬಾಯನು ಮುಚ್ಚಿಸೆ

The_Parrot_Addresses_Khojasta_at_the_Beginning_of_the_Seventh_Night,_Tuti-Nama,_ca._1570,_Cleveland_Museum_of_Art

????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

For those of you who don’t understand Kannada, here is a summary of the verse in English:

The pet parrot heard the conversation of the couple ( the Samskrta word used is daMpati, indicating they’re  married) and kept repeating those conversations, in front of the other elders in the home the following morning. Blushing in embarrassment, the girl tried giving her ruby earrings to the pet,  trying to convince it was a pomegranate fruit so that the parrot would stop its high pitched chatter.

(Picture: An illustration from Tutinama, a work in Persian – Now in the Cleveland Museum of Art. Picture taken from Wikimedia)

If you understand Kannada, you may notice that the translation is not word-by-word. For example, the phrase “कर्णालंबित पद्मरागशकलं” indicating an elaborate ruby ear hanging has been translated as “ಕಿವಿಯಲೋಲಾಡುತಿಹ ಕೆಂಪಿನ ಓಲೆ”. The word  “प्रातः” (early morning) has been changed as “ಹಗಲಲಿ” (during day time). The word “श्रुत्वा” (heard), does not appear in the translation but it is implied. In spite of these changes, I think the translation keeps true to the mood of the original verse.
41SDRMR8V3L._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_

Generally, before translating any of these verses from Amaru Shataka,  I do read them several times in the original commentaries in Samskrta ( Rasika Sanjeevini of Arujuna Varma dEva and Shrngara Deepika of Vema Bhupala) to understand any intricacies that I may not get easily when I read the Samskrta verse. I also have a prose translation of the work in Kannada, which comes in handy sometimes. And finally there are couple of English translations which I refer rarely – because I find the those translations somewhat contrived and convoluted in structure, not to belittle the efforts of those translators.  One of those is the translation by Prof Greg Bailey and published by the Clay Sanskrit Series 

Today was one of those rare occasions when I tried to read the English translation of the specific verse I quoted before. I am glad that I did refer to it *after* I wrote my Kannada version, and not before!

Here is how it is translated by Greg Bailey:

 

Of two lovers chattering in the night
A house parrot heard the conversation
Which, morning come, it utters too shrilly near the young bride’s parents
Hearing this,
She placed a piece of ruby – a semblance of a pomegranate fruit – from her ear before his beak.
For sick with shame
She contrives to block his speech.

While the original verse says “husband and wife”, in the translation they become “lovers” (not that a married couple can’t be lovers!). The “elders” referred in the original become “bride’s parents” in the English translation. For anyone knowing anything about Indian traditions, it would be clear that the elders are very likely the husband’s parents and not the wife’s.  Finally  while the original verse describes the embarrassment of the girl, and probably the blushing of her face to stop the parrot’s chatter,  in the English translation she is “sick with shame”!

What has all this to do with Prof Sheldon Pollock’s work ? Suffice to say that he is the General Editor of the Clay Sanskrit Library.

I respect Prof Pollock or anyone in the Western or Eastern world who have worked on ancient Indian works. But that does not mean I should stop calling a spade a spade! I am not even getting into the political overtones and misrepresentation of facts concerning early India in his other writings in this post, but as they say in Kannada, “ಅನ್ನ ಬೆಂದಿದೆಯೋ ಇಲ್ಲವೋ ಅಂತ ಹೇಳೋಕೆ, ಒಂದು ಅಗುಳು ನೋಡಿದರೆ ಸಾಕು” – You just have to check a single grain of rice to see if it’s cooked or not.

And so does stand my opinion against Prof Pollock or people like him heading the Murthy Classical Library or such other Indian cultural initiatives.

-neelanjana

 

 

For the last few years, I have been translating individual verses from Amaru Shataka randomly.  Amaruka Shataka is a Samskrta work from the 8th century.

Although there are some stories about Amaruka,  we know pretty little historically about him except for that he must have lived before ~800 AD.  However there is no doubt that his verses are considered top-class by the best exponents of Rasa theory.

For those of you interested, her is a recording of a talk I gave recently, about Amaruka’s poetry. Also, I have tried to classify the heroes and the heroines of these verses  based on the categorization seen in Bharata’s nAtya ShAstra.

I have used the original verses, and my own Kannada translations in this talk – The talk is in a mish-mash of English and Kannada, and so even if you do not understand Kannada, you might find something interesting in the talk:

 

-neelanjana

Hits

  • 545,938

My book “Hamsanada” for iPad, iPhone or iPod

A Collection of  Samskrta Subhashitas, translated to Kannada

http://www.saarangamedia.com/product/hamsanada

My Book, on Google Play!

My Book Hamsanada, on Google Play

My Book Hamsanada, on Google Play

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 3,394 other followers

ಅವಧಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ಹೀಗಂದರು:

"ಅಲ್ಲಿದೆ ನಮ್ಮ ಮನೆ…ಇಲ್ಲಿ ಬಂದೆ ಸುಮ್ಮನೆ… ಎಂಬ ಘೋಷ ವಾಕ್ಯದೊಂದಿಗೆ ಬ್ಲಾಗ್ ಮಂಡಲದಲ್ಲಿ ಕಾಣಿಸಿಕೊಂಡವರು ನೀಲಾಂಜನ. ಅಲ್ಲಿದೆ ನಮ್ಮ ಮನೆ ಕನ್ನಡದ ಪರಿಮಳವನ್ನು ಇಂಗ್ಲಿಷ್ ನಲ್ಲಿ ಹರಡುತ್ತಾ ಇದೆ. ಕನ್ನಡದ ವಚನಗಳು, ಸಂಸ್ಕೃತ ಸುಭಾಷಿತಗಳು ಜೊತೆಯಲ್ಲೇ ಸಂಗೀತ ಹೀಗೆ ಹಲವು ಲೋಕವನ್ನು ಈ ಬ್ಲಾಗ್ ಪರಿಚಯಿಸಿದೆ." ಅವಧಿ, ಮೇ ೧೫, ೨೦೦೮

ಇತ್ತೀಚಿನ ಟಿಪ್ಪಣಿಗಳು

charukesha on Where in the World is Mount…
neelanjana on 101 Books I Loved Reading
neelanjana on 101 Books I Loved Reading
ಹರಿಪ್ರದದ ಹೆಲೊ on 101 Books I Loved Reading
Anand Bidarkundi on 101 Books I Loved Reading
ಡಿಸೆಂಬರ್ 2017
ಸೋಮ ಮಂಗಳ ಬುಧ ಗುರು ‍ಶು ಶನಿ ಭಾನು
« ಸೆಪ್ಟೆಂ    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

ಬಗೆ ಬಗೆ ಬರಹ

ಸಂಗ್ರಹಗಳು