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The Murthy Classical Library of India initiative was in news recently with many scholars and non-scholars questioning the likes of Prof. Sheldon Pollock heading such an initiative. The crux of the matter was that such an important initiative must  be lead by  a scholar who is well versed in Indian classical traditions than Professor Pollock is.

True. Translating  is a tough art. Particularly so when it is from a language such as Samskrta with a long history,  and a tradition of advanced poetics which has lived for thousands of years. The fact that Samskrta does not remain  a commonly spoken language does not make the job any easier.  These facts have been accepted by scholars and translators such as Daniel H H Ingalls. If you are  interested,  you can read his essay, “Some Problems in the Translating of Sanskrit Poetry” here.

From the last several years, I have been doing stray translations of Samrkta verses to Kannada. While the difficulty of translation from Samskrta to Kannada may not be as challenging as from Samskrta to English, it is still not very easy. I agree that the brevity of Samskrta, the dual-meanings (shlEsha) it can convey enhancing the beauty of the verse are very hard to match. And as a translator, I believe that a translation has to be as close to the original to create the same mood, not introduce new concepts not found in the original and not miss out what is intended in the original as much as possible. While you can do a word-by-word translation, it is probably not the best in conveying the thought of the original. This is why a  translator has to know the language to which s/he is translating to a better extent than the language s/he is translating from. And also know the cultural baggage of both languages, so that the verse makes sense in translation.

In the past few years, I have translated about half of the well known work of Amaruka, known by the name Amaru Shatakam. You can find those translations on this Facebook page of AmaruShatakam.  Check it out if you read Kannada.

Although Amaru Shatakam  is supposed to contain 100 verses as the name suggests, there are about 160 verses when you consider all the available recensions. Amaru Shataka is considered as one of the finest specimens of Samsktta poetry about marital love. It is a collection of verses, and hence each verse tells a different story and can be read and enjoyed without reading the entire work.

Here is  a verse I translated from Amaru Shataka recently:

दम्पत्योर्निशि जल्पतोर्गृहशुकेनाकर्णितं यद्वचः
तत्प्रातर्गुरु सन्निधौ निगदतः श्रुत्वैव तारं वधूः
कर्णालंबित पद्मरागशकलं विन्यस्य चंच्वाः पुरो
व्रीडार्ता प्रकरोति दाडिमफलव्याज्येन वाग्बंधनम्

This verse, (#16 in the western recension of Amaru Shataka) is set in a meter called shArdUlavikrIDita. My translation in Kannada is set in mAtrA mallikAmAle but does not follow prAsa rules.

ಗಂಡಹೆಂಡಿರ ಇರುಳ ಸರಸದ ಮಾತ ಕೇಳಿದ ಮನೆಗಿಳಿ
ಅದನೆ ಹಗಲಲಿ ಹಿರಿಯರೆದುರಲಿ ಚೀರಿರಲು ನಾಚುತ್ತಲಿ
ಕಿವಿಯಲೋಲಾಡುತಿಹ ಕೆಂಪಿನ ಓಲೆಯಿರಿಸುತ ಕೊಕ್ಕಿಗೆ
ನೀಡಿಹಳು ದಾಳಿಂಬೆಯಿದು ಕೋಯೆನುತ ಬಾಯನು ಮುಚ್ಚಿಸೆ

The_Parrot_Addresses_Khojasta_at_the_Beginning_of_the_Seventh_Night,_Tuti-Nama,_ca._1570,_Cleveland_Museum_of_Art

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For those of you who don’t understand Kannada, here is a summary of the verse in English:

The pet parrot heard the conversation of the couple ( the Samskrta word used is daMpati, indicating they’re  married) and kept repeating those conversations, in front of the other elders in the home the following morning. Blushing in embarrassment, the girl tried giving her ruby earrings to the pet,  trying to convince it was a pomegranate fruit so that the parrot would stop its high pitched chatter.

(Picture: An illustration from Tutinama, a work in Persian – Now in the Cleveland Museum of Art. Picture taken from Wikimedia)

If you understand Kannada, you may notice that the translation is not word-by-word. For example, the phrase “कर्णालंबित पद्मरागशकलं” indicating an elaborate ruby ear hanging has been translated as “ಕಿವಿಯಲೋಲಾಡುತಿಹ ಕೆಂಪಿನ ಓಲೆ”. The word  “प्रातः” (early morning) has been changed as “ಹಗಲಲಿ” (during day time). The word “श्रुत्वा” (heard), does not appear in the translation but it is implied. In spite of these changes, I think the translation keeps true to the mood of the original verse.
41SDRMR8V3L._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_

Generally, before translating any of these verses from Amaru Shataka,  I do read them several times in the original commentaries in Samskrta ( Rasika Sanjeevini of Arujuna Varma dEva and Shrngara Deepika of Vema Bhupala) to understand any intricacies that I may not get easily when I read the Samskrta verse. I also have a prose translation of the work in Kannada, which comes in handy sometimes. And finally there are couple of English translations which I refer rarely – because I find the those translations somewhat contrived and convoluted in structure, not to belittle the efforts of those translators.  One of those is the translation by Prof Greg Bailey and published by the Clay Sanskrit Series 

Today was one of those rare occasions when I tried to read the English translation of the specific verse I quoted before. I am glad that I did refer to it *after* I wrote my Kannada version, and not before!

Here is how it is translated by Greg Bailey:

 

Of two lovers chattering in the night
A house parrot heard the conversation
Which, morning come, it utters too shrilly near the young bride’s parents
Hearing this,
She placed a piece of ruby – a semblance of a pomegranate fruit – from her ear before his beak.
For sick with shame
She contrives to block his speech.

While the original verse says “husband and wife”, in the translation they become “lovers” (not that a married couple can’t be lovers!). The “elders” referred in the original become “bride’s parents” in the English translation. For anyone knowing anything about Indian traditions, it would be clear that the elders are very likely the husband’s parents and not the wife’s.  Finally  while the original verse describes the embarrassment of the girl, and probably the blushing of her face to stop the parrot’s chatter,  in the English translation she is “sick with shame”!

What has all this to do with Prof Sheldon Pollock’s work ? Suffice to say that he is the General Editor of the Clay Sanskrit Library.

I respect Prof Pollock or anyone in the Western or Eastern world who have worked on ancient Indian works. But that does not mean I should stop calling a spade a spade! I am not even getting into the political overtones and misrepresentation of facts concerning early India in his other writings in this post, but as they say in Kannada, “ಅನ್ನ ಬೆಂದಿದೆಯೋ ಇಲ್ಲವೋ ಅಂತ ಹೇಳೋಕೆ, ಒಂದು ಅಗುಳು ನೋಡಿದರೆ ಸಾಕು” – You just have to check a single grain of rice to see if it’s cooked or not.

And so does stand my opinion against Prof Pollock or people like him heading the Murthy Classical Library or such other Indian cultural initiatives.

-neelanjana

 

 

For the last few years, I have been translating individual verses from Amaru Shataka randomly.  Amaruka Shataka is a Samskrta work from the 8th century.

Although there are some stories about Amaruka,  we know pretty little historically about him except for that he must have lived before ~800 AD.  However there is no doubt that his verses are considered top-class by the best exponents of Rasa theory.

For those of you interested, her is a recording of a talk I gave recently, about Amaruka’s poetry. Also, I have tried to classify the heroes and the heroines of these verses  based on the categorization seen in Bharata’s nAtya ShAstra.

I have used the original verses, and my own Kannada translations in this talk – The talk is in a mish-mash of English and Kannada, and so even if you do not understand Kannada, you might find something interesting in the talk:

 

-neelanjana

ಒಳ್ಳೆಯ ನಡತೆಯ ಮೇಲಿನ ಕೆಲವು ಸುಭಾಷಿತಗಳು. ಭಾವಾನುವಾದ ನನ್ನದು.

ಕೊಡದಿರು ಕುಲಕ್ಕೆ ಬೆಲೆ
ನಡತೆಗೆ ನೀಡು ಮಹತ್ತು!
ಎಡೆಬಿಡದೆ ಬೆಳೆದೀತು ಕಳೆ
ಹೊಲವದು ಸೊಗಸಿದ್ದಷ್ಟೂ!

ಸಂಸ್ಸ್ಕೃತ ಮೂಲ:

ಕಿಂ ಕುಲೇನೋಪದಿಷ್ಟೇನ ಶೀಲಮೇವಾತ್ರ ಕಾರಣಂ
ಭವಂತಿ ಸುತರಾಂ ಸ್ಫೀತಾಃ ಸುಕ್ಷೇತ್ರೇ ಕಂಟಕೀದ್ರುಮಾಃ

ಹೆರವರಿಗುಪದೇಶ ನೀಡುವುದರಲಿ
ಕುಶಲರು ಪ್ರತಿಯೊಬ್ಬರೂ
ಈ ನಡತೆಯ ತಡೆಸು ನಿಂತವರು
ಇರಬಹುದು ಸಾವಿರಕೊಬ್ಬರು!

ಸಂಸ್ಸ್ಕೃತ ಮೂಲ:

ಪರೋಪದೇಶಕುಶಲಾಃ ದೃಶ್ಯಂತೇ ಬಹವೋಜನಾಃ
ಸ್ವಭಾವಮತಿವರ್ತಂತಃ ಸಹಸ್ರೇಷು ಚ ದುರ್ಲಭಾಃ

ಬೆಟ್ಟದಾ ಕಾಡಿನಲಿ
ನೀರು ನಿಡಿ ಇಲ್ಲದೆಲೆ
ನಿಟ್ಟುಪವಾಸ ಸತ್ತರೂ ಲೇಸು
ಹಾವಿಗೆ ಮನೆಯಾದ
ಹಾಳು ಬಾವಿಯಲಿ
ಬೀಳುವುದೂ ಒಳಿತು
ಆಳದ ನೀರಿನ ಸುಳಿಯಲಿ
ಮುಳುಗುವುದೂ ಪದುಳವು
ಮನೆತನದ ಗರುವವನು
ನಡತೆಯನು ಕಳೆವುದಕಿಂತ!

ಸಂಸ್ಸ್ಕೃತ ಮೂಲ:

ವರಂ ವಿಂಧ್ಯಾಟವ್ಯಾಂ ಅನಶ್ನತೃಷ್ಣಾರ್ತಸ್ಯ ಮರಣಂ
ವರಂ ಸರ್ಪಾಕೀರ್ಣೇ ತೃಣವಿಹಿತಕೂಪೇ ನಿಪತನಂ
ವರಂ ಗರ್ತಾವರ್ತೇ ಗಹನಜಲಮಧ್ಯೇ ವಿಲಯನಂ
ನ ಶೀಲಾದ್ವಿಭ್ರಂಶೋ ಭವತು ಕುಲಜಸ್ಯ ಶ್ರುತವತಃ

-ನೀಲಾಂಜನ

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ಅವಧಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ಹೀಗಂದರು:

"ಅಲ್ಲಿದೆ ನಮ್ಮ ಮನೆ…ಇಲ್ಲಿ ಬಂದೆ ಸುಮ್ಮನೆ… ಎಂಬ ಘೋಷ ವಾಕ್ಯದೊಂದಿಗೆ ಬ್ಲಾಗ್ ಮಂಡಲದಲ್ಲಿ ಕಾಣಿಸಿಕೊಂಡವರು ನೀಲಾಂಜನ. ಅಲ್ಲಿದೆ ನಮ್ಮ ಮನೆ ಕನ್ನಡದ ಪರಿಮಳವನ್ನು ಇಂಗ್ಲಿಷ್ ನಲ್ಲಿ ಹರಡುತ್ತಾ ಇದೆ. ಕನ್ನಡದ ವಚನಗಳು, ಸಂಸ್ಕೃತ ಸುಭಾಷಿತಗಳು ಜೊತೆಯಲ್ಲೇ ಸಂಗೀತ ಹೀಗೆ ಹಲವು ಲೋಕವನ್ನು ಈ ಬ್ಲಾಗ್ ಪರಿಚಯಿಸಿದೆ." ಅವಧಿ, ಮೇ ೧೫, ೨೦೦೮
ಮಾರ್ಚ್ 2017
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